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A Good Problem: How to Handle a Financial Windfall

What do you do with sudden money?

Provided by Cornerstone Wealth Management

Imagine getting rich, quick. Liberating? Yes of course. Frustrating and challenging? Most likely.

Sudden money can help you resolve retirement saving or college funding goals, and set the stage for your financial independence. On the downside, you’ll pay higher taxes, attract more attention, and maybe even deal with “wealth envy.” Sudden Money may also include grief or stress if associated to death, divorce, or a employer buy-out.

Sudden Money does not always lead to happy endings. Take the example of Alex and Rhoda Toth, a real-life Florida couple down to their last $25 who hit a lottery jackpot of roughly $13 million in 1990. Their story ended badly: by 2006, they were bankrupt and faced tax fraud charges. Or Illinois resident Janite Lee, who won $18 million in the state lottery. Eight short years later, Janite filed for bankruptcy; had $700 to her name and owed $2.5 million to creditors. Sudden Money doesn’t automatically breed “old money” behavior or success. Without long-range vision, one generation’s wealth may not transfer to the next. Wealth coaching firm The Williams Group spent years studying the estate transfers of more than 2,000 affluent households. It found that 70% of the time, the wealth built by one generation failed to successfully migrate to the next.1,2

What are some wise steps to take when you receive a windfall? What might you do to keep that money in your life and in your family for their future?

Keep quiet, if you can. If you aren’t in the spotlight, don’t step into it. Aside from you and your family, the only other parties that need to know about your financial windfall is the Internal Revenue Service, the financial professionals who you consult or hire, and your attorney. Beyond those people, there isn’t generally an upside to notify anyone else.

What if you can’t keep a low profile? Winning a lottery prize, selling your company, signing a multiyear deal – when your wealth is more in the public domain, expect friends and strangers and their “opportunities” to come knocking at your door. Time to put on your business face: Be fair, firm, and friendly – and avoid handling the requests directly. One well-intended generous handout on your part may risk opening the floodgates to others. Let your financial team review requests for loans, business proposals, and pipe dreams.

Yes, your team. If big money comes your way, you need skilled professionals in your corner – a tax professional, an attorney, and a wealth manager. Ideally, your tax professional is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and or Enrolled Agent (EA) and tax advisor, your lawyer is an estate planning attorney, and your wealth manager is “big picture” and pays attention to tax efficiency.

Think in increments. When sudden money enhances your financial standing, you need to think about the immediate future, the near future, and the decades ahead. Many people celebrate their good fortune when they receive sudden wealth and live in the moment, only to wonder years later where that moment went. Many times, it is better to identify what needs immediate attention, and delay anything else until life becomes more stable.

In the short term, an infusion of money may result in tax challenges; it may also require you to reconsider existing beneficiary designations on IRAs, retirement plans, and investment accounts and insurance policies. A will, a trust, an existing estate plan – they may need to be revisited. Resist the immediate temptation to try and grow the newly acquired wealth quickly by investing aggressively.

Looking down the road a few miles, think about what financial independence (or greater financial freedom) means to you. How do you want to spend your time? Do you want to continue working, or change your career? If you own a business, should you stick with it, or sell or transfer ownership? What kinds of near-term possibilities could this mean for you? What are the strategies that could help you defer or reduce taxes long term? How can you manage investment and other financial risks in your life?

Looking further ahead, tax efficiency can potentially make an enormous difference for that windfall. You may end up with considerably more money (or considerably less) decades from now due to asset location and other tax factors.

Important idea: Think about doing nothing for a while. Nothing financially momentous, that is. There’s nothing wrong with that. Sudden, impulsive moves with sudden wealth can backfire.

Welcome the positive financial changes, but don’t change yourself. Remaining true to your morals, ethics, and beliefs will help you stay grounded. Turning to professionals who know how to capably guide that wealth is just as vital.

If you or someone you know would like to get coaching on the most appropriate to sudden money, we welcome your call.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc. and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – bankrate.com/finance/personal-finance/lottery-winners-who-went-broke-1.aspx#slide=1 [5/23/18]
2 – money.cnn.com/2018/09/10/investing/multi-generation-wealth/index.html [9/10/18]

This article was prepared by a third for information only. It is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

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Your Business Success is about Cash Flow Management

Strong income is only part of the picture

By Cornerstone Wealth Management

Cash Flow is King

The backbone of long term success for business owners is cash flow. Cash flow is defined as the difference between revenue and operating expenses. If over a long period of time business expenses are higher than revenue, the business could fail. Sounds simple, right? The challenge is, many business owners do not have a clear picture of their expenses. Cash on hand, accounts payable, and the use of credit can cloud the picture of an owner who has a “gut feel” how the business is operating.

Cash Flow statements are important to small businesses. This financial tool can reveal so much to owner(s) and/or CFO, because as they track inflows and outflows, and identify non-cash items and expenditures. A Cash Flow statement (CFS) captures sources and uses of cash, per month and per year. Income statements and Profit and Loss (P&L) statements may provide inadequate clues about cash flow, even though they help forecast cash flow trends.

Cash Flow statements can tell you what P&L statements won’t. Is your business profitable but cash poor? This can occur if your company is growing by leaps and bounds. Are you personally or inadvertently taking too much cash out of the business? That may transform your growth company into a lifestyle company. Are your receivables running too long? Is inventory growth a concern? If you’ve carry debt, do you know what the impact is of this debt to your cash flow? Do you know how much are you spending on capital equipment?

A good CFS can track operating, investing, and financing activities. Ideally, the sum of these activities results in a positive number at the bottom of the CFS. If not, the business may need to make adjustments to survive.

How can a small business improve cash flow management? Your CFS can help identify opportunities for improvement. You may find that your suppliers or vendors are too costly; maybe you can negotiate (or even barter) for better terms. Like many companies, you may find your cash flow is seasonal. Maybe you could take steps to moderate the peaks and valleys.

Can your business generate recurring, sustainable revenue? If it makes sense for your business, you might want to modify your fee structure – turn customers into subscribers to your services. Perhaps price points need adjusting, up or down. As for overdue receivables, swiftly preparing and delivering invoices can result in shorter receivable times. Another way to get clients to pay faster: offer a slight discount if they pay up inside a short period of time, or a penalty to those that don’t. If you do not already, consider requiring a deposit before you go to work for a client or customer.

If you or someone you know would like a thinking partner on this topic, we welcome your call.

#BusinessOwners #BusinessSuccess #FinancialPlanning #CashFlow #CashFlowStatement #P&L

 

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Is Your Company’s 401(k) Plan as Good as It Could Be?

Two recent court rulings may make you want to double-check.

How often do retirement plan sponsors check up on 401(k)s? Not as often as they should, perhaps. Employers should be especially vigilant these days.

Every plan sponsor should know about two recent court rulings. One came from the Supreme Court in 2015; another, from the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in 2017. Both concerned the same case: Tibble v. Edison International.

In Tibble v. Edison International, some beneficiaries of the Edison 401(k) Savings Plan took Edison International to court, seeking damages for losses and equitable relief. The plaintiffs contended that Edison International’s financial advisors and investment committee had breached their fiduciary duty to the plan participants. Twice, they argued, the plan sponsor had added higher-priced funds to the plan’s investment selection when near-identical, lower-priced equivalents were available.1

Siding with the plan participants, the SCOTUS ruled that under ERISA, a plaintiff may initiate a claim for violation of fiduciary duty by a plan sponsor within six years of the breach of an ongoing duty of prudence in investment selection.1

The unanimous SCOTUS decision on Tibble (expressed by Justice Stephen Breyer) stated that “cost-conscious management is fundamental to prudence in the investment function.” This degree of alertness should be applied “not only in making investments but in monitoring and reviewing investments. Implicit in a trustee’s [plan fiduciary’s] duties is a duty to be cost-conscious.”2,3

Two years later, the U.S. District Court ruled that Edison International had indeed committed a breach of fiduciary duty regarding the selection of all 17 mutual funds offered to participants in its retirement plan. It also stated that damages would be calculated “from 2011 to the present, based not on the statutory rate, but by the 401(k) plan’s overall returns” during those six years.3

The message from these rulings is clear: the investment committee created by a plan sponsor shoulders nearly as much responsibility for monitoring investments and fees as a third-party advisor. Most small businesses, however, are not prepared to benchmark processes and continuously look for and reject unacceptable investments.

Do you have high-quality investment choices in your plan? While larger plan sponsors may have more “pull” with plan providers, this does not relegate a small company sponsoring a 401(k) to a substandard investment selection. Sooner or later employees may begin to ask questions. “Why does this 401(k) have only one bond fund?” “Where are the target-date funds?” “I went to Morningstar, and some of these funds have so-so ratings.” Questions and comments like these may be reasonable and might surface when a plan’s roster of investments is too short.

Are your plan’s investment fees reasonable? Employees can deduce this without checking up on the Form 5500 you file – there are websites that offer some general information as to what is and what is not acceptable regarding the ideal administrative fees.

Are you using institutional share classes in your 401(k)? This was the key issue brought to light by the plan participants in Tibble v. Edison International. The U.S. District Court noted that while Edison International’s investment committee and third-party advisors placed 17 funds in its retirement plan, it “selected the retail shares instead of the institutional shares, or failed to switch to institutional share classes once one became available.”3

Institutional share classes commonly have lower fees than retail share classes. To some observers, the difference in fees may seem trivial – but the impact on retirement savings over time may be significant.3

When was the last time you reviewed your 401(k) fund selection & share class? Was it a few years ago? Has it been longer than that? Why not review this today? Call in a financial professional to help you review your plan’s investment offering and investment fees.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – faegrebd.com/en/insights/publications/2015/5/supreme-court-decides-tibble-v-edison-international [5/18/15]

2 – cpajournal.com/2017/09/13/erisas-reasonable-fee-requirement/ [9/13/17]

3 – tinyurl.com/yd8s2rq3 [8/17/17]

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Real Estate Investments Course Starts September 17, 2018 at UC Berkeley Extension, San Francisco Campus

The next Real Estate Investments for Financial Planners and Investors course starts Monday September 17th at the San Francisco UC Berkeley Extension campus. This class will serve as an important foundation for making buy, sell, and hold real estate investment decisions. The coursework includes

  • An introduction to real estate investment basics
  • The Real Estate Cash Flow model
  • Real estate ownership and finance
  • Case studies on real estate investment decisions, and how they have impacted personal financial goals

Click here to register. Or contact me if you have any questions, or if you would like a copy of the course outline.

Sincerely, Rich Arzaga, CFP®, CCIM, Instructor

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Menu of Services

CLICK HERE to check our Menu of Services

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Life Insurance Explained

A quick look at the different types of policies.

When it comes to life insurance, there are many choices. Whole life. Variable universal life. Term. What do these descriptions really mean?

All life insurance policies have two things in common. They guarantee to pay a death benefit to a designated beneficiary after a policyholder dies (although, the guarantee may be waived if the death is a suicide occurring within two years of the policy purchase). All require recurring payments (premiums) to keep the policy in force. Beyond those basics, the differences begin.1

Some life insurance coverage is permanent, some not. Permanent life insurance is designed to cover you for your entire life (not just a portion or “term” of it), and it can become an important element in your retirement planning. Whole life insurance is its most common form.2

Whole life policies accumulate cash value. How does that happen? An insurer directs some of your premium payments into a reserve account and puts those dollars into investments (typically conservative ones). The return on the investments influences the growth of the cash value, which builds up according to a formula the insurer sets.3

A whole life policy’s cash value grows with taxes deferred. After a while, you gain the ability to borrow against that cash value. You can even cancel the policy and receive a surrender value. Premiums on whole life policies, though, are usually higher than premiums on term life policies, and they may rise with time. Also, beneficiaries only receive a death benefit (not the policy’s cash value) when a whole life policyholder dies.2,4

Universal life insurance is whole life insurance with a key difference. Universal life policies also build cash value with taxes deferred, but there is the chance to eventually pay the monthly premiums out of the policy’s investment portion.5

Month by month, some of your premium on a universal life policy gets credited to the cash reserve of the policy. Sooner or later, you may elect to pay premiums out of the cash reserve – so, the policy essentially begins to “pay for itself.” If all goes well, a universal life policy may have a lower net cost than a whole life policy. If the investments chosen by the insurer severely underperform, that can mean a dilemma: the cash reserve of your policy may dwindle and be insufficient to keep paying the premiums. That could mean cancellation of the policy.5

What about variable life (and variable universal life) policies? Variable life policies are basically whole life or universal life policies with a riskier investment component. In VL and VUL policies, you may direct percentages of the cash reserve into investment sub-accounts managed by the insurer. Assets allocated to the sub-accounts may be put into equity investments of your choice as well as fixed-income investments. If you choose equity investments, you (and the insurer) assume greater risk in exchange for the possibility of greater reward. The performance of the subaccounts cannot be guaranteed. As an effect of this risk exposure, a VUL policy usually has a higher annual cost than a comparable UL policy.6

The performance of the stock market may heavily affect the performance of the subaccounts and the policy premiums. A bull market may mean better growth for the policy’s cash value and lower premiums. A bear market may mean reduced cash value and higher monthly payments to keep the policy going. In the worst-case scenario, the cash value plummets, the insurer hikes the premiums in order to provide the guaranteed death benefit, the premiums become too expensive to pay, and the policy lapses.6

Term life insurance is life insurance that you “rent” rather than own. It provides coverage for a set period (usually 10-30 years). Should you die within that period, your beneficiary will get a death benefit. Typically, the premium payments and death benefit on a term policy are fixed from the start, and the premiums are much lower than those of permanent life policies. When the term of coverage ends, you may be offered the option to renew the coverage for another term or to convert the policy to a form of permanent life insurance.2,7

Term life is cheap, but the tradeoff comes when the term is up. Just as you cannot build up home equity by renting, you cannot build up cash value by “renting” life insurance. When the term of coverage is over, you usually walk away with nothing for the premiums you have paid.7

Which coverage is right for you? Many factors may come into play when deciding which type of life insurance will suit your needs. The best thing to do is to speak with a qualified insurance professional who can help you examine these factors, so you can determine which type of coverage may be appropriate.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – thebalance.com/does-a-life-insurance-policy-cover-suicide-2645609 [6/5/18]
2 – fool.com/retirement/2017/07/20/term-vs-whole-life-insurance-which-is-best-for-y-2.aspx [7/20/17]
3 – investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/082114/how-cash-value-builds-life-insurance-policy.asp [4/30/18]
4 – insure.com/life-insurance/cash-value.html [12/12/17]
5 – thebalance.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-universal-life-insurance-2645831 [5/8/18]
6 – insuranceandestates.com/top-10-pros-cons-variable-universal-life-insurance/ [9/1/17]
7 – consumerreports.org/life-insurance/how-to-choose-the-right-amount-of-life-insurance/ [3/30/18]

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Key Person Insurance

A way for businesses – especially niche businesses – to address a major risk. 

Who are the people most crucial to your business? Have you taken steps to insure them?

At every company, there are certain people whose absence would cause day-to-day operations to grind to a halt. If they die or become disabled, the future of the company may be jeopardized.

Key person insurance is designed to help businesses deal with this kind of major disruption. Its payout can offer some monetary relief so that operations can continue running smoothly.

Small & large businesses choose key person insurance for a variety of reasons. The insurance benefit can be used to settle outstanding loans, and to fund the recruitment and training of a new hire. Key person insurance benefits may also help in an ownership transition, and become a component in an executive compensation plan. If a key person dies, the business owner(s) may want to provide his or her spouse or family with the equivalent of their salary for a time.

How easy it is to arrange this type of insurance? In a word, very. As private insurance, it requires no IRS filings or disclosures. In the case of key person life insurance, both permanent life and term life options may be explored. Typically, term coverage is the choice.1,2

Key person disability insurance amounts to an insurance contract, whereby the policy provides coverage up to a certain age or a certain date – for example, the end of the period in which monthly cash benefits are paid to the disabled employee, or the retirement date of the employee.

The payout from a key person insurance policy is tax-free. As a tradeoff for that, the premium payments are not tax-deductible. Typically, the company owns the policy, pays the premiums and is listed as policy beneficiary.2,3

This is the kind of perk that can help you attract & keep good employees. The knowledge that a manager or executive can count on some financial support in the event of a health crisis, the understanding that his or her family could receive insurance benefits in the event of a tragedy – this may make a job offer that much more compelling.

Key person insurance can even be continued after the key employee retires or transfers his or her ownership interest – a nice addition to that person’s retirement package.

Key person insurance can also boost your standing as you seek financing. It can give your business added financial stability that might help its loan prospects and credit position. If you apply for a business loan, the question of whether you have key person insurance will come up quickly. If your company lacks key person coverage, the loan may not be forthcoming. If you intend to apply for a loan guaranteed through the Small Business Administration, key person insurance is often a prerequisite.4

Niche businesses arguably need this coverage the most. A software development firm, a biomedical company, any kind of business where the owner or employees must have “expert” knowledge of a discipline or an industry … these businesses may be most at risk if a key employee dies or is left disabled.

Does your company lack key person insurance? Too many businesses do. While insuring a company’s information, equipment and inventory against loss is par for the course, insuring a business against the loss of human and creative capital is not. A loss of knowledge and mastery can spell the end for a business that has transitioned from survival to success, and even for an established sole proprietorship or partnership. Look into this today, for you never know what tomorrow may hold.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – rbcinsurance.com/business/small-business/key-person-insurance.html [11/9/15]
2 – smallbusiness.com/manage/why-you-need-key-person-insurance/ [11/9/15]
3 – raymondjames.com/small_business_key.htm [11/9/15]
4 – sba.gov/offices/headquarters/oca/resources/4950 [11/9/15]

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Midyear Outlook 2018

The recently released LPL Research Midyear Outlook 2018: The Plot Thickens is filled with investment insights and market guidance to take us through the rest of the year. So far this year, the return of the business cycle has brought the fiscal policy changes that were expected to propel economic activity and the financial markets higher in 2018.

Policy remains a key theme to watch. Tax cuts, a more business-friendly regulatory environment, and increased government spending should support consumer spending, business investment, and corporate profits—key drivers of LPL Research’s economic and stock forecasts. The biggest risk to investor confidence this year has been around trade, including new tariffs. When comparing the fiscal measures with the potential impact of increased tariffs, however, the benefits appear to outweigh the costs. With these factors in mind, policy changes should have a positive influence on the economy and markets.

Another theme that may garner more attention this year is that certain economic and market indicators may have peaked, and that we may have seen the best out of this expansion. However, the context is critically important here. Reaching these points with a strong economic backdrop is expected and indicates the potential for continued growth; in addition, historically, we’ve seen an average of four more years of stock gains after triggering these market signals. So, although we are in the later stages of the economic cycle, it does not appear that a recession is looming.

Against this backdrop, LPL Research maintains the forecasts that were set forth at the beginning of 2018, following the passage of the new tax law. Expectations are for 3% gross domestic product growth for the U.S. economy, with tax cuts, government spending, and deregulation measures providing support. As expected, accelerating economic growth and rising interest rates continue to pressure bonds; thus, flat to low-single-digit returns are projected for bonds (as measured by the Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index). However, it’s prudent to note that high-quality bonds may provide diversification benefits for investors’ portfolios.

Strong earnings are expected to remain the key driver of stock gains, thanks to the benefits of the new tax law. Given that we are in the later stages of this economic cycle, with factors such as increased trade tensions and geopolitical uncertainty at play, greater market volatility may be ahead. But it’s important to remember that experiencing these ups and downs is a normal aspect of our market environment. Also, within the context of steady economic growth and strong corporate profits, there is the potential for stock gains of 10% or more (as measured by the S&P 500 Index).

Overall, economic and market growth is expected to continue in 2018 and beyond, and the LPL Research Midyear Outlook 2018 is here to provide insightful commentary to help you navigate the year ahead. If you have any questions, I encourage you to contact me.

Important Information

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual security. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing.

All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted.

There is no guarantee that a diversified portfolio will enhance overall returns or outperform a nondiversified portfolio. Diversification does not ensure against market risk.

Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. No investment strategy or risk management technique can guarantee return or eliminate risk in all market environments. Bonds are subject to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rates rise and bonds are subject to availability and change in price.

The S&P 500 Index is a capitalization-weighted index of 500 stocks designed to measure performance of the broad domestic economy through changes in the aggregate market value of 500 stocks representing all major industries.

The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is a broad-based flagship benchmark that measures the investment-grade, U.S. dollar-denominated, fixed-rate taxable bond market. The index includes Treasuries, government-related and corporate securities, MBS (agency fixed-rate and hybrid ARM pass-throughs), ABS, and CMBS (agency and non-agency).

Additional descriptions and disclosures are available in the Midyear Outlook 2018: The Plot Thickens publication.

This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

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Choosing a Financial Professional

There’s nothing like doing your homework and being selective.

When we buy a car or a house, consider a school for our children, or plan our next vacation, what kind of approach do we take? For one thing, we take our time. We shop around and consider our choices.

Yet when it comes to selecting a financial consultant, not everyone takes such care. Chuck Jaffe, for many years a MarketWatch columnist, often spoke to audiences on this topic, and when doing so, he liked to conduct an informal poll. He started by asking people to raise their hand if they had ever worked with a financial advisor. Typically, many hands went up. Next, he asked them to keep their hands in the air if they hired the first financial advisor they met with in their search. Seldom did a hand lower. Then he asked them to keep their hands up if they did a background check on that person before agreeing to work together. Jaffe noted that when that third question was asked, “[I] never had a single hand stay in the air.”1

Credibility and compatibility both matter. When it comes to the “alphabet soup” of financial industry designations, some of them carry more clout than others. Some of the most respected professional designations are Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP®), Chartered Financial Consultant® (ChFC), and Chartered Financial Analyst® (CFA). These designations are earned only after thorough examinations and a required curriculum of college-level studies in financial planning applications, retirement, insurance and estate planning fundamentals, and other topics. Real-world experience complements this course of study.2

Beyond a financial professional’s credentials and designations, you have the matter of compatibility. You don’t want to work with someone who insists that you fit into a preconceived box, for you are not simply Investor A, Investor B, or Investor C who deserves this or that generic strategy. Better financial professionals really get to know you – and they will not be offended if you make the effort to get to know them.

This is a relationship-based business, and when a financial consultant offers a thoughtfully considered, personalized strategy to a client resulting from one or more discovery meetings, they have taken a step to earn the respect and trust of that client. Finer financial professionals abide by a client’s preferences and risk tolerance and take the client’s values, needs, and priorities into account.

How do you “check out” a financial professional? You can visit www.finra.org (the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority) and use FINRA BrokerCheck to see if anything questionable has occurred in their career. If that financial professional is an investment advisor, you can go to the Securities and Exchange Commission website and look at that advisor’s Form ADV at advisorinfo.sec.gov. Part 1 will tell you about any issues with clients or regulatory agencies; Part 2 will tell you about the advisor’s services, fees, and investment strategies.3,4

In addition, AARP offers you a Financial Adviser Questionnaire, and websites like ussearch.com and paladinregistry.com can provide you with further information.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – marketwatch.com/story/7-mistakes-investors-make-in-hiring-advisers-2010-05-20 [5/20/10]
2 – csmonitor.com/Business/Saving-Money/2017/0205/A-simple-guide-to-the-many-financial-advisor-designations [2/5/18]
3 – brokercheck.finra.org/ [6/13/18]
4 – adviserinfo.sec.gov/ [6/13/18]

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How New Tax Laws Affect Small Businesses

A recap of the major changes impacting corporations and closely held firms.

The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act changed the tax picture for business owners. Whether your company is incorporated or held closely, you must recognize how the recent adjustments to the Internal Revenue Code can potentially affect you and your workers.

How have things changed for C corps? The top corporate tax rate has fallen. C corps now pay a flat 21% tax. For most C corps, this is a big win; for the smallest C corps, it may be a loss.1

If your C corp or LLC brings in $50,000 or less in 2018, you will receive no tax relief – your firm will pay a 21% corporate income tax as opposed to the 15% corporate income tax it would have in 2017. Under the old law, the corporate income tax rate was just 15% for the first $50,000 of taxable income.1,2

Another notable change impacting C corps involves taxation of repatriated income. Prior to 2018, American companies paid U.S. tax rates on earnings generated in foreign countries; those profits were, essentially, taxed twice. Now they are being taxed differently – there is a one-time repatriation rate of 15.5% on cash (and cash equivalents) and 8% rate on illiquid assets, and those taxes are payable over an 8-year period.2

By the way, the 20% corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) is no more. The tax reforms permanently abolished it.2

What changed for S corps, LLCs, partnerships, and sole proprietorships? They can now deduct 20% of the qualified business income they earn in a year. Cooperatives, trusts, and estates can do the same. This deduction applies through at least 2025.2,3

The fine print on this deduction begs consideration. If you are a lawyer, a physician, a consultant, or someone whose firm corresponds to the definition of a specified service business, then the deduction may be phased out depending on your taxable income. Currently, the phase-out begins above $157,500 for single filers and above $315,000 for joint filers. Above these two thresholds, the deduction for a business other than a specified service business is limited to half of the total wages paid or one quarter of the total wages paid plus 2.5% of the cost for that property, whichever is larger.2

Salaried workers who are thinking about joining the ranks of independent contractors to exploit this deduction may find it a wash: they will have to pay for their own health insurance and absorb an employer’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes.2

What other major changes occurred? The business depreciation allowance has doubled and so has the Section 179 expensing limit. During 2018-22, the percentage for first-year “bonus depreciation” deductions is set at 100% with a 5-year limit and applies to both used and new equipment. The maximum Section 179 deduction allowance is now $1 million (limited to the amount of income from business activity) and the phase-out threshold begins $500,000 higher at $2.5 million. Also, a business can now carry forward net operating losses indefinitely, but they can only offset up to 80% of income.4

The first-year depreciation allowance for a car bought and used in a business role is now $10,000; it was $3,160. Claim first-year bonus depreciation, and the limit is $18,000. (Of course, the depreciation allowance for the vehicle is proportionate to the percentage of business use.) The TC&JA also created a new employer tax credit for paid family and medical leave in 2018-19, which can range from 12.5%-25%, depending on the amount paid during the leave.4,5

Some longtime business tax deductions are now absent. Manufacturers can no longer claim the Section 199 deduction for qualified domestic property activities. Business deductions for rail and bus passes, parking benefits, and commuter vehicles are gone. Deductions have also been repealed for entertainment costs linked directly to or associated with the conduct of business.4

Business owners should also know about the new restriction on 1031 exchanges. A like-kind exchange can now only be used for real estate, not personal property.3

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – thebalancesmb.com/corporate-tax-rates-and-tax-calculation-397647 [2/5/18]

2 – investopedia.com/taxes/how-gop-tax-bill-affects-you/ [2/14/18]

3 – americanagriculturist.com/farm-policy/10-agricultural-improvements-new-tax-reform-bill [12/27/17]

4 – cpapracticeadvisor.com/news/12388887/2018-tax-reform-law-has-benefits-for-some-small-businesses [1/2/18]

5 – marketwatch.com/story/use-your-car-for-your-small-business-the-new-tax-law-is-good-news-for-you-2018-03-06 [3/6/18]