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7 Myths About Retirement

By Cornerstone Wealth Management

Before it is too late, let’s clear up some important misconceptions. While some retirement clichés have been around for decades, others have recently joined their ranks. Let’s explore seven popular retirement myths.

  1. “When I’m retired, I won’t need to invest anymore.” Many see retirement as an end of a journey, a finish line to a long career. In reality, retirement can be the start of a new phase of life that could last for decades. By not maintain positions in equities (stocks or mutual funds), it is possible to lose ground to purchasing power as even moderate inflation has the potential to devalue the money you’ve saved. Depending on your situation, a good rule of thumb may be to keep saving money, keep earning income, keep invested, even in retirement.
  2. “My taxes will be lower when I retire.” Not necessarily. While earning less or no income could put you in a lower tax bracket, you could also lose some of the tax breaks you enjoyed during your working years. In addition, local, state and federal taxes will almost certainly rise over time. In addition, you could pay taxes on funds withdrawn from IRAs and other qualified retirement plans. This could include a portion of your Social Security benefits. Although your earned income may decrease, you may end up losing a meaningfully larger percentage of it to taxes after you retire.1
  3. “I don’t have enough saved. I’ll have to work the rest of my life. If your retirement resources are falling short of what you might need in later years, working longer may be the most practical solution. This will allow you to use earned income to cover expenses for a longer period, and shorten the number of years you would need to otherwise cover when you stop work. Meanwhile, you may be able to make larger, catch-up contributions to IRAs after 50, and remember that you have savings potential in workplace retirement plans. If you are 50 or older this in 2018, you can put as much as $24,500 into a 401(k) plan. Some participants in 403(b) or 457(b) plans are also allowed that step-up. And during this time, you can downsize and reduce debts and expenses to effectively give you more retirement money. You can also stay invested longer (see #1 above).2 The bottom line is, don’t give up, and fight the good fight.
  4. “Medicare will take care of my long term care expenses.” Not true, and among the most costly of these myths. Medicare may (this is not guaranteed) pay for up to 100 days of your long-term care expenses. If you need months or years of long-term care and do not own a long term care policy or own a policy and don’t have adequate coverage, you may have to pay for it out of pocket. According to Genworth Financial’s Annual Cost of Care Survey, the average yearly cost of a semi-private room in a nursing home is $235 a day ($85,775 per year).3,4 In Northern California, the cost will likely be higher.
  5. “I should help my kids with college costs.” That’s a nice thought, an expensive idea, and for many not a good idea. Unlike student financial assistance, there is no such program as retiree “financial assistance.” Your student can work, save, and or borrow to pay to cover their cost of college. S/he will have decades to pay loans back. In contrast, you can’t go to the bank and get a “retirement loan.” Moreover, if you outlive your money your kids may end up taking you in and you may be a financial burden to them, which for many is a parent’s worst nightmare. Putting your financial requirements above theirs may be fair and smart as you approach retirement.
  6. “I’ll live on less in retirement.” We all have an image in our minds of a retired couple in their seventies or eighties living modestly, hardly eating out, and relying on senior discounts. In the later phase of retirement, couples often choose to live on less, sometimes out of necessity. However, the initial phase may be a different story. For many, the first few years of retirement mean traveling, new adventures, and “living it up” a little – all of which may mean new retirees may actually “live on more” out of the retirement gate.
  7. “No one really retires anymore.” It may be true that many baby boomers will probably keep working to some degree. Some people love to work and want to work as long as they can. What if you can’t, though? What if your employer shocks you and suddenly lets you go? What if your health does not permit you to work as much as you would like, or even at all? You could retire more abruptly than you believe you will. This is why even people who expect to work into their later years should have a solid retirement plan.

There is no “generic” retirement experience, and therefore, there is no one-size-fits-all retirement plan. Each individual, couple, or family should have a strategy tailored to their particular money situation and life and financial objectives.

If you or someone you know would like to get coaching on the most appropriate approach to planning for retirement, we welcome your call.

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This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc. and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – money.usnews.com/money/retirement/iras/articles/2017-04-03/5-new-taxes-to-watch-out-for-in-retirement [4/3/18]
2 – fool.com/retirement/2017/10/29/what-are-the-maximum-401k-contribution-limits-for.aspx [3/6/18]
3 – medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html [9/13/18]
4 – fool.com/retirement/2018/05/24/the-1-retirement-expense-were-still-not-preparing.aspx [5/24/18]